Photo by Laura Marie Rivera
?A girl finishes up an art project at the grand opening of ArtHOME, a community arts hub launched by Path with Art Saturday at Seattle Center.
Photo by Laura Marie Rivera ?A girl finishes up an art project at the grand opening of ArtHOME, a community arts hub launched by Path with Art Saturday at Seattle Center.

 

 

By Laura Marie Rivera

Contributing writer

 

Last Saturday, Path with Art, an organization dedicated to healing the effects of trauma through arts engagement and community-building, celebrated the grand opening of ArtHOME — a community arts hub at Seattle Center.

ArtHOME is stationed on the ground floor of Plymouth Housing’s newly completed Kristen Benson Place (200 Mercer St). The building offers 91 housing units for formerly unhoused neighbors. The community arts hub features 4,800 square feet of multidisciplinary art studios, gallery and recording facilities built to serve thousands of low-income individuals and community members, according to a news release.

The shared goal of ArtHOME is to connect arts, culture and social service to create a place for communities to come together.

The grand opening celebration included art-making workshops from Path with Art's community of artists, as well as music, food, and dance. A large crowd gathered to visit the new space, listen to music and poetry, participate in a sweepstakes to win a signed Pearl Jam guitar and to hear remarks from some of the people who helped make the space a reality.

Jill Rulkoetter, Path with Art's board president, and Holly Jacobson, Path with Art CEO, welcomed the crowd and introduced the other speakers.

“The arts — in a safe and welcoming community — help people heal, connect and thrive,” Jacobson said. “The ArtHOME will provide an inclusive community arts hub for people to come together to write and rewrite their own narratives and connect to each other through creativity. There really is an alignment right now between the need for community recovery and Path with Art’s mission.” 

Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell was on hand to sing the praises of the program and said that there could be no economic recovery without the arts. Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal was celebrated for securing federal funds for the Arts Recovery Project.

“The new Path with Art space in Uptown is a great addition to our community,” Seattle District 7 Councilmember Andrew Lewis said. “Their classes, mentorship opportunities and programming will change lives for years to come.” 

ArtHOME’s fall programming starts in October, and registration is open now.

Path with Art partners with more than 60 social services agencies. Adults who are affiliated with these organizations and are veterans or earn less than $25,000 are eligible to register. Participants must also refrain from using drugs or alcohol during Path with Art activities.

Programs include art classes, a choir, open studio sessions and a Peer Leadership Program that offers members certificates and an opportunity to develop their voice in the Speaker's Bureau.